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john mccain and others giving them more information. they had hoped by sending this yesterday or the day before, that they could change minds and make the senators vote yes to proceed to the vote even if they wanted to reject hagel's nomination. it wasn't. it seems like they are unhappy with this pick, they wanted the president to make a different pick, and they wanted to be -- host: we did see four republicans cross over and vote with democrats and one voting present and not voting to move forward or not. why did they go that way and who were they? guest: senator hatch was one. either you vote yes or you vote no. there was talk that he doesn't believe in the filibuster so he did not want to vote no. i think you should probably vote yes. but republican leadership was actively against this vote so i guess that would be the reason. of the people who voted to not block it one of them was senator collins who is the more moderate republican from the northeast. also the senator from nebraska which is chuck hagel's home state. there was another person who voted to proceed but democra
in particular? we saw senator rubio give the gop response. caller: i think mark rubio, john mccain, ted cruz, a lot of these congressmen who have been in government for a while, and some of the new ones are doing the job that they were sent there to do. they are representing the constituency from where they are from. the democrats do the same. i know we have differences on both sides of the aisle, but i believe that being able to -- being able to work together and coming together as a nation and congress has a lot to do with barack obama as the president. he was reelected. he needs to be in the white house. he needs to lead this nation. he does not need to be out in campaign mode. that is all i have seen from barack obama. campaign, speech -- let's get everybody in the white house, and let's get things done. guest: a couple of points -- we hear this from constituents, that they are frustrated that they are not seeing the leadership. what he is saying really plays into that. leaders are team builders. they know how to bring people forward to find consensus. the president's speech the other ni
2004. mitt romney barely won as many votes as john mccain did in 2008. if you compare preelection estimates to exit polls, what you find is 5 percentage points of independents didn't show up. so the party that actually figures out how to represent these independents, and my hunch is many of them are these social liberal voters is going to be ahead in the demographic race. that's why you saw smart democrats actually run functionally libertarian campaigns. notice democrats who won, they ran on fiscal issues and distanced themselves from the president. they stole the rhetoric of fiscal conservatives. this is also why you found republican candidates who won, they ran on fiscal issues but they didn't emphasize abortion. over time, i believe the party that embraces this libertarian center of the public will come ahead in the demographic battle. the second point i'd like to make is about the tea party. some people think the tea party lost the election particularly in the senate. and the argument goes something like that this n. 2010 there was kristine o'donnell and in 2012 there is today
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3